HackVenture

It Doesn’t Have to be Crazy at Work

Business is not war

Treat your company as a product. Optimize accordingly

Concept of Trust battery; trust doesn’t go down to zero right away. It gets depleted over time. Similarly, it doesn’t go up to 100% immediately, it takes time to build.

Owner’s need to lead by example, actions matter. Evading responsibility with a “but it’s just a suggestion” isn’t going to call the waters. Only knowing the weight of the owner’s word will

“Low hanging fruit” is usually a little higher than you thought. Don’t expect massive results from some action just because you “weren’t doing it before”. The next time you ask an employee to go pick some low hanging fruit, stop yourself. Respect the work that you’ve never done before.
Remind yourself that other people’s jobs aren’t so simple. Not having done something before doesn’t make it easy. It usually makes it hard

Continued sleep deprivation batters your IQ and saps your creativity. Frequently seen as heroic to sacrifice yourself for the mission. Fuck the mission. No mission is worthy of such dire personal straits. Sleep deprived people aren’t just short on brains or creativity, they’re short on patience too. Short on understanding. Short on tolerance. A great night’s sleep enhances every waking hour. Your brain is still active at night. It works through matters you can’t address during the day.

Hire people, not resumes. For example when choosing a new designer, hire each if the finalists for a week, pay them $1,500 for their time, and ask them to do a sample project for them. Then they have something to evaluate that’s current, real and completely theirs. No riddles, no blackboard problem solving etc. We don’t answer riddles all day, we do real work. By doing this you avoid hiring an imaginary person.

Hire people not because of who they are but because of who they could become.

I remember trying out basecamp and not quite liking that the chat wasn’t “responsive” enough.
Learnt why it’s purposely made this way. “real-time sometimes, asychronous most of the time” and “if it’s important, slow down”.

Dreadlines. No moving of deadlines. A deadline with a flexible scope invites pushback, compromises and tradeoffs. All ingredients in healthy, calm projects.

No kneejerking. Let people have time to consider ideas and proposals instead of forcing them to react on the spot like in typical meetings.

Hire when it hurts. Slowly, and only after we clearly need someone. Not in anticipation of possibly maybe.

Disagree and commit. As long as people are truly heard and it’s repeatedly demonstrated that their voice matters, those of ho shared will understand that even if things don’t fall their way this time. What’s especially important in disagree and commit situations is that the final decision should be explained clearly to everyone involved. It’s not just decide and go, it’s decide, explain, and go.

Compromise on quality. Knowing when to embrace good enough is what gives you an opportunity to be truly excellent when you need to be. Don’t do shit work, but attempting to be indiscriminately great at everything is a foolish waste of energy. Rather than put endless effort into every detail, we out lots of effort into separating what really matters from what sort of matters from what doesn’t matter at all. The wctvof separation should be your highest quality endeavour. Easy to say everything has to be great but anyone can do that. Challenge lies in figuring out where you can be just kinda okay or even downright weak. Of you do one thing to 100%, you’ve spent 100% to get that one thing. If you spend 20% each on getting 5 things to 80%, then you’ve done 5 things! Almost always take that trade. Being clear what demands excellence and what’s perfectly okay just being adequate is a great way to bring a sense of calm into your work.

Team of three is most effective, usually 2 programmers and one designer.

Happiness is shipping: finishing good work, sending it off, then moving on to the next idea.

No is no to one thing. Yes is no to a thousand things. When you say no now, you can come back and say yes later. When you say yes now, it’s harder to say no later. Knowing what you’ll say no to is better than knowing what you’ll say yes to.

Priced to lose. Interesting that they have deliberately chosen fortune 5000000 companies and actively decided they would not pursue fortune 500 companies as the sales process etc are vastly different and would thus change the culture in the company.

Launch and learn, no need to do surveys etc, actual results will tell you what you need to do.

No big deal or the end of the world. Whichever token you pick, they’ll take the other. It doesn’t really matter who’s right at the end of the day. Arguing with heated feelings will just increase the burn.

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